'Quit 1Password' or 'Quit 1Password Completely' - what's the difference?

As above really. I switched to the 1PW account today as I wanted to use 2 factor authentication and also intend to buy a Secure Key for information that really matters (where services offer the secure key option) and I noticed these two different Quit options on the Mac app. They may have both been there before but I only noticed them today. The difference is?


1Password Version: 7.8.7
Extension Version: Not Provided
OS Version: Mac OS 11.6

Comments

  • dancodanco Senior Member Community Moderator

    Quit 1PW will leave the Mini running (the item in the menu bar) so you can still access passwords. But the main 1PW window will be closed if it was open.

    Quit Completely will turn off the Mini also, so you have no access to your passwords until you start 1PW again.

    Most of the time you don't want to quit completely, but if you need to delete the program and reinstall (for instance) you will need to quit completely.

  • Ah, right. Thanks for that. I actually have the Mini / Helper turned off, I always found the damn prompt popping up on just about every site that has a dialogue box to complete far more intrusive than helpful (gets in the way of me using the internet and definitely didn't improve the experience for me), so I can use either. Not sure if the helper is any better these days but it's good to have the option for those that do use it.

  • ag_anaag_ana

    Team Member

    @Chevalier:

    I always found the damn prompt popping up on just about every site that has a dialogue box to complete far more intrusive than helpful (gets in the way of me using the internet and definitely didn't improve the experience for me), so I can use either.

    I should note that the prompt you are referring to is a setting in the browser extension, 1Password mini is separate. So you can keep 1Password mini active even without the browser prompts, for instance.

  • ChevalierChevalier
    edited October 6

    @ag_ana Thanks for the comments. I'm actually thinking that the Secure Key maybe something that I jumped into too quickly into having done a fair bit of research but where some more may have been useful LOL. The marketing around these keys is very good but, having now received it, I'm left thinking 'OK what else am I going to use it for?'.

    Part of me thinks the best move I made in terms of security was migrating to a 1PW Account from Dropbox sync, I guess (and it is a guess) that Dropbox would have been the only weak link in my security perviously with having the Vault there. Now it's out of Dropbox, and now I have 2FA enabled (in my case registered with Microsoft Authenticator), I have a feeling that the secure key might actually be more of a hassle than a help. I always have my phone with me, I might not always have the secure key. I suppose though I could enable the secure key than leave it locked in the safe at home in case I ever lose my phone. I am assuming that if I have both the Authenticator and Key options enabled I can still use the Authenticator even though I have the key? So use the key as a back up as opposed to the primary means of authenticating.

  • ag_anaag_ana

    Team Member

    @Chevalier:

    For confirmation, by "Secure Key" do you mean the Secret Key, or a hardware security key, like a Yubikey?

  • ChevalierChevalier
    edited October 6

    @ag_ana Hardware key, specifically the YubiKey 5C NFC.

  • ag_anaag_ana

    Team Member

    @Chevalier:

    Thank you for the confirmation!

    I am assuming that if I have both the Authenticator and Key options enabled I can still use the Authenticator even though I have the key?

    This is then correct :+1:

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