Can I designate someone to aecess my acct when I die? Other than just giving them my pw?

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Comments

  • Maybe some variation on the shared vault feature based on some trigger? I would feel comfortable if my Private vault was actually some kind of limited-shared vault. Just a thought...
    In addition, some thought should be applied to that process to make it as straightforward as possible for our successor(s)... for those of us who've put some thought into the organization of our family accounts, that's going to be a big surprise for our less-technical family members. Helping them through that process would be reassuring.

  • BenBen AWS Team

    Team Member

    @Redarkrah

    Some of the big questions that come from any sort of high tech / triggered process is:

    1. Where does the recipient get the encryption keys for your data from? Do we have to store them in escrow? If so, that's a non-starter. One of the attractions about 1Password is that we never have the keys necessary to decrypt and read your data. Only you know your account password and Secret Key, which are required to decrypt your data.
    2. Can the triggering event be abused? For example, if what triggers the event is that the recipient puts in a request which fires off an email to you. If you have X amount of time to respond to that email before the keys are turned over, how do we know that email didn't go to spam? Or that the recipient didn't trigger it while they knew you were on vacation and not checking emails?

    We've thought about this from a lot of different angles, and so far the best solution we've been able to come up with continues to be a low tech one:

    1. Print a copy of your Emergency Kit: Get to know your Emergency Kit
    2. Write in your account password
    3. Store the document someplace safe, such as a fire safe, bank deposit box, or with your other estate planning documents
    4. Make sure to update the stored kit if you ever change your account password or Secret Key (*)

    (*) One thing I've considered is making an entirely separate executor account within my 1Password Families membership. This enables me to do two things:

    1. I can store anything I don't want to pass along to anyone else upon my death in my Personal/Private vault. Those items will die with me.
    2. I can change my own credentials at-will without having to remember to update the document

    I haven't actually gotten around to doing that myself yet, but it is something worth considering, if you're a 1Password Families user. We'll continue to brainstorm on this subject, but please understand it isn't a simple problem to solve, and we want to be sure we do it right if we do it at all.

    Ben

  • Ben, thanks for going over the thinking. IMHO, the Emergency Kit is too tech-y for many folks... I think some combination of existing features (with tweaks, possibly) may be a more workable solution.

  • BenBen AWS Team

    Team Member

    @Redarkrah

    Would you mind elaborating on that a bit for me? A physical piece of paper with sign-in instructions is about the lowest tech possibility I can think of. 😄

    Ben

  • Good question... I think they'll be challenged to recover/manage the account. I'm looking for a way to expose the links/credentials to them as transparently as possible. I have some in a shared vault already but I don't want to expose "everything" until it's needed... "least privilege" and all that. So, if there was a way to have a shared vault with a timeout or "break glass" feature, I'd keep all but my "dies with me" stuff in that vault. Does that make sense?
    Eventually, someone would have to manage the account but it wouldn't be a time-critical issue... until renewal time (which I have already covered with a gift card... just to give you an idea where my head's at).

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